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Posts tagged “Paint

Perfume Portrait #8 – Richard Bradley

Richard Bradley 50ml EDTP1020385

Description

The logical alternative to the blandness of modern television, this fragrance allows you to re-live all the fun of static television within your own nose. With conductive copper wire and a slightly repellent application of paint, this fragrance suggests that instead of TV, maybe it’s time to go and make something.

Features

Citronella, a natural repellent, instantly attempts to sway the mind away from TV, though this is offset by the an attempt to depict the comfort and atmosphere of watching television. Black pepper and pine suggest domestic, indoor activity, and this is reinforced by vanilla musk. Hints of clove and basil also offer a sense of familiarity, like a comfortable old chair.

This fragrance was created by interpreting and investigating a response to the question ‘Why do you make art?’ If you are an artist (in the broadest sense of the word) I would love to her your response to the question too, as it will enable me to create a perfume portrait that captures the essence of your creative persona. 

This perfume will be on display at Bank Street Arts, Sheffield, from 2-18th March 2016. There will be a Private View on the 2nd March from 6-8pm. More details here

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Artists’ Paint Colour #4 – Cups Stacked on Top of Each Other

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #4 – Cups Stacked on Top of Each Other

With unique texture and a bold, unashamed hue, ‘Cups Stacked On Top Of Each Other’ can always be relied upon. Whether depicting social interactions or moments of quiet reflection, this brutally rich paint seeks to make a statement.   

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Artists’ Paint Colour #3 – Overheard Conversations

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #3 – Overheard Conversations in Public Spaces

Specialist paint with a joyously inconsistent texture and a playful sense of Alchemy, ‘Overheard Conversations in Public Spaces’ celebrates innovation by considering accident and chance within the context of paint. Useful for those times where you deliberately seek to relinquish control of a painting.

Idea handed to me by artist Sally Sheinman

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Artists’ Paint Colour #1 – The Hotel

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #1 – The Hotel

A theatrical exploration of the properties of pigment, ‘The Hotel’ has a clean texture and smooth consistency that evokes certain nostalgia. With a strong surface sheen and stiff, glossy texture, The Hotel is able to communicate both the real and the artificial.

Idea handed to me by artist Richard Bradley

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Reflecting on my Latest Paint-Making Workshop

Last Wednesday I held the first of three paint making workshops to be held at The Bessemer II Gallery in Sheffield.

As ever, the paint making workshop provided me with the opportunity to engage with local artists by sharing knowledge and highlighting the possibilities of paint, including how to create paint from everyday foods and the notion that paint is able to be considered the end result of a creative process.

I hope my workshops make people think a little differently about paint, enriching their approach to the medium and perhaps allowing them to explore ways of developing a relationship with paint in a way that will directly further and develop their practice. I also cannot dismiss the importance of the social aspect of the event, which can encourage collaboration, professional development and, dare I say it, friendship!

This particular workshop went very smoothly indeed. I believe that each participant benefited from the event, learning how to make paint from food but, importantly, exploring how to apply what they’ve learnt to their own practice.

The second paint making workshop will be at Bessemer II on 8th October, and the third on on 12th November. The workshop costs £20, which includes all materials and refreshments. If they sound interesting to you, there’s still places left; so book ’em while you can!


Artists Required for Thoughts Towards a Painting that Doesn’t Exist.

I am creating a piece of work that assesses the nature of painting, and speculates whether a painting needs to exist if we are able to design, brand and distribute the idea of a painting within the context of commercialism. Basically, the work has me collect thoughts – imagined by artists – towards a painting they could make that doesn’t exist.

It could be a painting that you have considered before but haven’t got round to, or it might be entirely imagined but still within the context of your practice. I will take the findings and create paints based on thoughts the artist has towards a piece of work. These paints will then be branded as artists’ ideas. I’m aiming to create a tension between the audience and the ethical considerations of owning artists thoughts.

If you have any thoughts towards a painting created by yourself that doesn’t exist, please let me know. I’d love to hear from you.Even if you’re not predominantly a painter, but that doesn’t really matter – you could still have an idea for a painting that fits in with your practice. I have already began to design paints around the thoughts of artists, the first one I have created derives from artist Richard Bradley’s Idea of creating a painting, which would have been a comment on cult television programme, The Hotel:

Paint made from Richard Bradley's idea.

Paint made from Richard Bradley’s idea.

I am a little unclear in terms of how I will present my work as yet. Ideally, I would design a shop unit and allow an audience to literally complete a transaction that acts as a comment towards ethical and philosophical implications of ownership and creative control. The customer would go away being able to use the thought of an artist however they wish, and would be able to purchase an artist’s idea as easily and cheaply as purchasing paint. A problematic notion that raises questions of the relevance of painting in light of consumerism.

Every ‘Artists Thought’ work I do will be isolated in an individual blog post, which will act as an advertisement for the paint product.

If you’d like me to use an idea you have for a painting that doesn’t exist, please respond by emailing borkowskyart@gmail.com. …Or leave a comment in the comments section. Many thanks. 

 

 

 

 


The Triumphant return of the Paint Making Workshop!

Unceremoniously, I have sprained my ankle, which has dictated a halt in creative proceedings. I have designed a make-shift studio in my living room, complete with hastily purchased paint products and canvases. However, progress is slow due to the endless balancing act of attempting to apply pigment to surface whilst keeping my foot in a levitated position at all times.

And yet, in the wake of such frustration, some excellent news. From September I shall be hosting a paint making workshop at Bessemer II Gallery, Sheffield, on the second Wednesday of each month. The workshop will give you the opportunity to play, explore and engage with the possibilities of paint, and will allow you to network and meet like-minded people. If you are interested, please contact me. The first workshop is on 10th September. See you there, we’ll have fun.

 

FINALFLYER2


Back With a Spice Rack

If you have been wondering where I have escaped to for the last month or so (and let’s face it, most of you have) I can joyously claim that I’ve actually been getting some bloody work done. The last few weeks have been a relentless pursuit of finished articles before the bite of winter renders the studio I work in uninhabitable. I find it a bit of a struggle to exact a balance between making stuff and networking. Often I fluctuate in preference between one and the other. Over the last few weeks though, a very tangible rhythm has emerged that has resulted in a relative abundance of finished works.

So where the bloody hell are these finished works, I hear you cry. Well, I’m not going to show you them all. Instead, I shall tantalise you simply by producing one piece of work at a time. So let’s start things off in style shall we? Ladies and gentlemen, I give to you, a spice rack. Yes, a spice rack:

'The Spice Rack.' Comprised of paint made from 16 spices, applied to a surface and stored in bottles.

‘The Spice Rack.’ Comprised of paint made from 16 spices, applied to a surface and stored in bottles.

This is not just any old spice rack though. Here, I wish to initiate a discourse between the nature of paint and painting. Applying meaning to paint by attaching experiential sentiment to the bottles the paint is contained within. The painting itself is passive, acting merely as a reference to the bottles. The painting is completed to allow an audience to further identify with the paints, but it is not a means to an end in it’s own right. It is within the bottles from which meaning is attached, and so the idea of commercialism and the prospect of purchasing memory and sentiment that is removed from personal experience is called into question.

I am toying with the idea of presenting it for the John Moores painting prize next year. I believe it challenges the idea of what can be considered a painting and as such, it certainly possesses a level of intrigue. What do you think? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this piece in order for me to attain a reasonable understanding of an audience’s response.


My Paint-Making Workshop Experience

So, I’ve finally gone and done a bit of teaching. I have finally imparted whatever remnants of wisdom I have onto others, which they can apply to their own artistic endeavours. How did it go? Well, rather bloody well actually. And I am very grateful to Cupola Gallery for their hospitality and for thinking that a paint making workshop was a good idea in the first place.

My paint-making workshop in action!

My paint-making workshop in action!

My workshop seems to be pretty solid ‘straight out of the box,’ with only a few tweaks needed for my next gig at Bank Street Arts. 5 people attended, which was perfect because I was able to conduct the workshop with a sense of informality. It felt more like a few friends with like-minded ambitions that came together to chat about an artistic endeavour, which was lovely, as I was instantly able to feel at ease.

I started by introducing myself and my practice and showed examples of my paint applied to a surface. I then proceeded to conduct a working demonstration of how paint is created before the attendees had a go themselves: A pretty simple yet effective workshop model. However, whilst I knew more or less what to expect, what I hadn’t bargained for was how I would feel afterwards. A palpable sense of accomplishment engrossed me as I knew that those who attended had gone away with something useful, tangible and captivating.

However, my workshop was by no means perfect. Hare a few things that I will tweak for the future:

  • I need a few more props and materials. – I didn’t bargain for the volume of work that would be created. Bringing too many materials would be more beneficial than bringing just enough. I ran out of eggs part way through – though that was easily redeemed by nipping to ASDA. I also ran short of canvas board. Which was less redeemable, but I got round it by supplying paper and acetate. I also think that a hand-out, describing and imbedding what I said throughout the workshop, would be valuable for attendees to take home.
  • I need to remember that there is value in what I have to say – I felt a little awkward initially adopting the role of a teacher. What I do as an artist is quite idiosyncratic and intuitive: But I think that if what I do can’t be imparted in some way, allowing people to apply it to their own way of thinking, then it is useless. Workshops are a good way to share experiences, and the reason why people attend a workshop like this is to learn. Embracing the teacher dynamic with confidence may make for more coherent and engaging workshop in the future.

So, with this, and my experience in mind, I will now strive to make my Bank Street Arts paint making workshop every bit a success.

If you’re interested in attending my paint making workshop at Bank Street Arts on 28th September, you can find details here – https://www.facebook.com/events/649424818409817/?ref=22


Seeing the Future

My latest work signifies something of a breakthrough in terms of what a jar of paint can depict: A degree of subjection is instantly attached to the contents of each jar. They no longer represent paint; they represent the essence of paint.

Four Jars of Memory

The properties of food have still been exploited in order to achieve the paint. But rather than describing the face value of the paint, labels have been attached that describe metaphorical and experiential attachment to the paint, based on the paint’s properties.  For example, the label ‘Home’ is attached to paint made from tea. This is because the concept of a cup of tea contains within it connotations associated with the experience of being home.

The jar of paint is now able to communicate the notion that memory has an intrinsic and complex correspondence to the food we consume, and that preconception dictates our preference to food.

A notable juxtaposition is that, inherently, what I have created are still essentially jars of paint – meaning that they can be consumed, exchanged, revered and dismissed in the same way all products can. The notion of memory-based subjection and individual regard becomes restated as a consumable item.

I have also applied each paint to a surface in equal rectangular strips behind the corresponding jar. The nature of applying paint in this way seeks to remove subjection and seeks to regard application of paint as a reference – a tool which one can use to ascertain the nature and density of the paint at face value. The medium has therefore exchanged roles with the painting – for it is the medium that communicates an idea and the painting that becomes an object.

So, this is ‘where I’m at,’ as it were. But I believe that this breakthrough acts as a precursor to something grander, with more emphasis on the notion that memory and connotation can be appropriated as a consumable product.