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Posts tagged “paint making

Artists’ Paint Colour #4 – Cups Stacked on Top of Each Other

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #4 – Cups Stacked on Top of Each Other

With unique texture and a bold, unashamed hue, ‘Cups Stacked On Top Of Each Other’ can always be relied upon. Whether depicting social interactions or moments of quiet reflection, this brutally rich paint seeks to make a statement.   

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Artists’ Paint Colour #3 – Overheard Conversations

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #3 – Overheard Conversations in Public Spaces

Specialist paint with a joyously inconsistent texture and a playful sense of Alchemy, ‘Overheard Conversations in Public Spaces’ celebrates innovation by considering accident and chance within the context of paint. Useful for those times where you deliberately seek to relinquish control of a painting.

Idea handed to me by artist Sally Sheinman

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Artists’ Paint Colour #2 – Empty Frame

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #2 – Empty Frame

Velvety, rich and decadent with the tactile consistency of freshly churned butter, Empty Frame is a double pigment colour with a subtlety that eludes many. Specifically formulated to stimulate non-visual inclinations, Empty Frame is able to effortlessly assail the senses. 

Idea handed to me by artist Emma McLean

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Artists’ Paint Colour #1 – The Hotel

Taking ideas from artists and turning them into paint. Each paint is already primed with implications and preconceptions based on the artists’ ideas: This allows you to choose between using the paint as a raw medium, or exploiting the connotations found within the paint. The choice is yours.  

Colour #1 – The Hotel

A theatrical exploration of the properties of pigment, ‘The Hotel’ has a clean texture and smooth consistency that evokes certain nostalgia. With a strong surface sheen and stiff, glossy texture, The Hotel is able to communicate both the real and the artificial.

Idea handed to me by artist Richard Bradley

ARTISTS – If you have an idea for a painting that, for one reason or another, never reached fruition, email borkowskyart@gmail.com and I will allow your idea to be realised through the process of paint making.


Reflecting on my Latest Paint-Making Workshop

Last Wednesday I held the first of three paint making workshops to be held at The Bessemer II Gallery in Sheffield.

As ever, the paint making workshop provided me with the opportunity to engage with local artists by sharing knowledge and highlighting the possibilities of paint, including how to create paint from everyday foods and the notion that paint is able to be considered the end result of a creative process.

I hope my workshops make people think a little differently about paint, enriching their approach to the medium and perhaps allowing them to explore ways of developing a relationship with paint in a way that will directly further and develop their practice. I also cannot dismiss the importance of the social aspect of the event, which can encourage collaboration, professional development and, dare I say it, friendship!

This particular workshop went very smoothly indeed. I believe that each participant benefited from the event, learning how to make paint from food but, importantly, exploring how to apply what they’ve learnt to their own practice.

The second paint making workshop will be at Bessemer II on 8th October, and the third on on 12th November. The workshop costs £20, which includes all materials and refreshments. If they sound interesting to you, there’s still places left; so book ’em while you can!


The Triumphant return of the Paint Making Workshop!

Unceremoniously, I have sprained my ankle, which has dictated a halt in creative proceedings. I have designed a make-shift studio in my living room, complete with hastily purchased paint products and canvases. However, progress is slow due to the endless balancing act of attempting to apply pigment to surface whilst keeping my foot in a levitated position at all times.

And yet, in the wake of such frustration, some excellent news. From September I shall be hosting a paint making workshop at Bessemer II Gallery, Sheffield, on the second Wednesday of each month. The workshop will give you the opportunity to play, explore and engage with the possibilities of paint, and will allow you to network and meet like-minded people. If you are interested, please contact me. The first workshop is on 10th September. See you there, we’ll have fun.

 

FINALFLYER2


Stepping into the Sheffield Culinary Scene

For the past few weeks I have had my commercial head thoroughly screwed on. As a contemporary artist untroubled by the stigma that is ‘making a bit of money’, I have decided to thrust myself into the realm of selling my work at a stall on a bank holiday weekend. Well, sort of.

Bird’s Yard is an independent shop that showcases local art and craft in Sheffield, and as such, seems like an ideal venue for which to see whether the paints I make have any commercial value. Moreover, the event Bird’s Yard is holding – Named ‘Farm Yard’ – centres on the theme of food and local produce: Doubly ideal then, seeing as the paints I make are made from ground food, egg yolk and a bit of sunflower oil.  I will be unleashing my paints onto the steely gaze of the general public between 12pm and 4pm at Bird’s Yard on Saturday 24th May.

 This alluring promotional shot of my paints is suet to get the public salivating.This alluring promotional shot of my paints is sure to get the public salivating.

As well as my paints, I shall be selling work made using my paints, as well as giving the public a chance to attend a paint making workshop – which will give people the opportunity to make their own paints from food.

I shall also be selling other food related goodies, including paintings of fruit that are sold like fruit – cheaply and with a discount for bulk buying. Not to mention prints of teabags for a little as £1; postcards of my work and two zines that detail my fascination with mould and my desire to create a cookbook.

As an exercise in aligning the status of art to the status of food, I’d wager that holding a stall at an event such as this gives the opportunity for food within the realms of fine art to collaborate with its tangible and real-life subjects. For art to fall seamlessly alongside that which it is depicting is able to at once ground artistic practice and allow food to transcend it’s physical properties. I want my work to depict and relate to the value of food. Therefore allowing it to integrate an event that caters to the needs of greengrocers, bakers, preserve makers, and food proprietors successfully addresses my needs in an identifiable way.

As previously mentioned, Bird’s Yard on Chapel Walk will host ‘Farm Yard at Bird’s Yard’ on Saturday, May 24, from noon to 4pm. Why not pop along and see what’s going on? It is free entry, after all.

 


Learning From America

Two weeks ago I embarked on a journey to Jamestown, NY, in order to install and create work for an exhibition which was to be held over two gallery spaces from 4th April until 24th April. It was a massive venture into the unknown, which removed me from familiarity and demanded that myself and my work engage with an entirely new audience.

It was a group exhibition, held by SCIBase, which saw over 20 international artists produce work loosely based on the theme of ‘Colonize’. The piece I created contained sixteen foods locally sourced from Jamestown. The intent was to create a cohesive piece of work that would pull foods originating from various corners of the world into an inclusive environment, allowing each food to correspond to each other and to an audience.

Still Life with 16 Experiences

Still Life with 16 Experiences

So, was the exhibition itself a success? Yes, it was. My work was generally very well received and attracted a lot of interest. A potent mix of providing Jamestown with something they hadn’t seen before and the excitement created by virtue of having international artists exhibiting provided all artists involved with a real satisfaction.

My work responded well both to the environment and to the other works on display. There was a coherence found within the display that was unexpected – as we did not know exactly what some of the work would look like. And, upon spending several days getting acquainted with the exhibition and allowing myself to absorb it, it struck me how effectively the work of Bruce Davies informed my piece. Both our works use memory as a device to drive evocations, and we both utilise non-visual ways of communicating. So you could engage with my piece whilst still being able to hear Bruce’s sculpture, and interact with Bruce’s piece whilst still being able to smell the food I had used in my work. A very tangible sensory assault – informed by memory and the evocations found within memory – was present.

The sound scultures of Bruce Davies were able to inform the experience of my work

The sound sculptures of Bruce Davies were able to inform the experience of my work

If I was to pull anything negative from my time at Jamestown it would be aimed squarely at the work I produced. Paint making has become part of my identity but I feel increasingly as though I am being predictable. Perhaps it was a subconscious search for familiarity in the wake of embarking on a journey to a place I have never been to, with people I didn’t know. I just feel too accustomed to the practice, and too much within my comfort zone. I need to challenge myself before I seek to create challenging work.

Upon departing, it hit me: Paint making as an avenue of enquiry has reached a logical conclusion. The piece I presented in Jamestown contained further conceptual mileage, as it considered the use of local produce against exported produce and aspired towards a cohesive and inclusive piece of work. The concept of colonisation was therefore instilled into the work successfully. But now what? Food, as a concept and paint, as a concept are rich sources of investigation and inspiration that transcend the practice of paint making.

I decree that it is time to explore new heights. I would suggest that my time in Jamestown affirmed my desire to research new avenues of enquiry in order to further my practice. Looking ahead, I am going to curate and organise a couple of shows around the theme of video games – something pretty removed from my current practice, though the nostalgia and evocations found within video games do resonate with the sensations of experiencing food. I am also going to collaborate with Sharon Mossbeck on a piece for the Liverpool Biennial on the theme of Leviathan. Again, whilst this is seemingly removed from the practice of re-imagining still life there are parallels to be explored.

So, I would like to thank my experience in Jamestown for providing me with the apparatus I needed to instigate furthering my practice.  Now it’s time to see what else I can do.

 


The Pressures of an Impending Exhibition

This is more of a freak post than a new one – it is a direct result of my previous post and acts as an appendage to it. It is merely to express my sheer disbelief at the fact that it is now less than one week until my exhibition and corresponding workshop.

I still have plenty to do but I am very much on schedule. I tend to channel the feeling of pressure in a positive and productive way, and at the moment I am producing about two fully completed works a day. Though when I expect the exhibition to contain over 150 works, an indication of the amount of work I need to do in order for my exhibition to be successful is presented.

It is undoubtedly natural to feel anxious about the formalities of hanging your own exhibition – incorporating all promotional work and writing information panels – but I’ve found I’ve benefited from being so completely absorbed in the process. Hell, I’d even suggest that the process has consolidated and refined my practice, and developed my professional outlook. Indeed, as a result of regular online  networking, one establishment has even asked if I’d like to exhibit for them after my show has finished! Whilst we’ll have to wait and see the outcome of that particular folly, the fact that I have engaged people with my practice before they have even seen any artwork has got to be encouraging.

One thing I am sure of is the shape in which the exhibition will take. It will essentially focus on six avenues of enquiry, each highlighting the value and role of food within artistic practice. The principle of re-imagining still life – a fundamental part of my practice – is alive in every single piece of work that will be on display, and indeed the differing avenues of enquiry will compliment, develop and inform each other and exist relative to another.

A Hint of Lemon

‘A Hint of Lemon’ – One avenue I explore in my exhibition is the capacity still life painting has to confront language, and render ways of describing taste literal.

Naturally, the implications of this is a wholly considered body of work, that offers an audience a place to lay out their thoughts towards food – no matter how sporadic – and allow them to develop into meaningful knowledge. Well that’s the plan anyway. I should probably stop rambling on about it to be honest. The work won’t do itself!

All that’s left for me to say is that ‘Shelf Life’ – the name of my exhibition – will be held at Gage Gallery, Sheffield, and runs from 28th February ’til 12th March. There is a private view on the 28th from 7pm. My paint making workshop will also be held at Gage Gallery, and is a one day workshop, on the 1st March, from 10am ’til 3pm. If you’d like more information about my upcoming exhibition and workshop, click here.  or send me an email at borkowskyart@gmail.com. Thank you.


News About My Upcoming Exhibition and Paint Making Workshop.

Over the last month I have been feverishly painting as many pictures of fruit as I can; applying paint directly to loaves of bread; wrapping apples in modroc; painting works of still life; looking long and hard at pictures of burgers and applying thirty-two homemade egg tempera paints to a board.

So, why the hell am I doing all this? Well, because each of these endeavours form some part of my upcoming solo exhibition – named ‘Shelf Life’ – which will be held at Gage Gallery: A gallery space that forms part of Kelham Island Arts Co-Operative (or KIAC,) in Sheffield.

  Shelf Life

‘Shelf Life’ seeks to question the role of food in art. This includes questioning our perception of value, re-imagining the genre of still life, an enquiry into how emotion can be attached to disposable produce, and a documentation of the trials of trying to render the invisible sensations of taste and smell visible, with coherence.

Food is, of course, a massive topic, and will undoubtedly become a lifelong investigation. What I hope an audience can gain from this exhibition is an informed and clearer understanding of their own thoughts towards the nature and properties of food, and a place for which such thoughts to coalesce and crystallise. Further, I wish to question pre-conceptions towards the value of art, and attempt to ground it within the identifiable realities of purchasing consumable products. I believe that art should relate to the subject it is rendering as seamlessly as possible, and aligning the status of art to the status of food allows my work to become direct, accessible and relevant.

The exhibition runs from 28/02/14 until 14/03/14. There is also a private viewing of the show on 28/02/14 from 7pm. I hope you can make it.

In addition to my exhibition, and coinciding with it, comes my Paint Making Workshop, due to be held at KIAC’s Education Space on 1st March:

Paint making workshop

Participants of this workshop will be shown a working demonstration of the paint making process, before having a go at creating paints for themselves, and applying them to a surface. Participants will gain valuable experience in developing an affinity with their materials, which I believe is integral to producing coherent works of art.

The workshop takes place from 10am til 3pm on 1st March, and costs £20 (or £15 for students) and promises to be a fun and worthwhile day.

I hope that something within these events is intriguing and I hope for as many of you to attend as possible. You can find more information about these events on my Facebook events. Just click here. Or feel free to send me an email at borkowskyart@gmail.com.

Thank you.